Why I’m a Patriot and a Revolutionary

Why I’m a Patriot and a Revolutionary

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If you’re a homeschooler, you probably at one time or another looked up some of the more famous homeschoolers, like our founding fathers.  Before the late 1800s, virtually everyone in the United States was homeschooled with a few exceptions.  There were private schools, but not what we call “public schools”.  Back then, we were collectively considered a literate bunch, us Americans.  If you’ve read the Declaration of Independence and the U.S. Constitution, you’re probably as proud as I am that those guys were Americans and they were homeschooled and yet they were very eloquent and very principled.  They were patriots and they were revolutionaries.

The world we live in today is very different from then.  Now corporations run our government and our commerce.  They control our houses, our banks, our jobs, and our education.  They control just about everything.  Corporations have all the rights of individual citizens, but none of the responsibilities.  If a corporation breaks a law, it doesn’t go to jail.  It doesn’t get a black mark on its reputation.  It doesn’t even get a black mark on its credit report.  It just goes on making more money.  This is the fundamental flaw in the system.  What keeps the rest of the country lawful doesn’t apply to corporations.  Simply put, corporations are unconstitutional.

Certain principles were part of our Bill of Rights.  In case you never learned them, here they are:

  1. Freedom of religion
  2. Right to keep and bear arms
  3. No quarter given to soldiers during peace and only as prescribed by law in times of war
  4. Right against unreasonable searches and seizures
  5. Capital crimes require indictment by a Grand Jury; cannot be charged twice for the same crime; right not to self-incriminate; right to due process of law; right to just compensation for property acquired for public use
  6. Right to a speedy and public trial by an impartial jury and right to confront witnesses; right to defense counsel
  7. Right to trial by jury
  8. Right against excessive bail, excessive fines, or cruel and unusual punishment
  9. Constitutional rights do not preclude other rights retained by the people
  10. Powers not delegated to the federal government by the Constitution and powers not prohibited from the federal government by the States, shall be reserved to the States or to the people

Obviously, these rights were meant to be reserved for people, not corporations or arbitrary artificial entities. As Americans, our own constitutional rights cannot possibly be preserved while corporations commit crimes with impunity (exemption from punishment).

A monopoly is an entity that controls the market for a specific good.  Amazon is a perfect example.  It controls the market for books and has put thousands of small book sellers out of business.  The entire publishing industry has changed because of Amazon and so have author’s rights and copyright laws.  When a large corporation is also a monopoly, then it controls that market freely with no controls (laws).  People, who are governed by controls (laws), aren’t so lucky.  We can’t go about doing what we want with impunity.  We have to follow the law.  So any time when a corporation is pitted against an individual, the individual always loses.  Corporations control our credit ratings, an artificial number assigned to how honestly we pay our debts.  These credit ratings are now used in background checks so they determine how much you’ll pay for your house, whether or not you’ll get a good interest rate at the bank, and whether or not you’ll get that job you’ve always wanted.  The reach of corporations is pervasive.  They control a large portion of our lives.

Most people think inside a box, as most people are public schooled.  Public education stresses conforming to corporate ideals so you’ll make a good worker.  Don’t rock the boat.  Don’t think outside the box.  Those who think outside the box are usually called revolutionary.  That’s not always the best definition of revolutionary, but it’s a good start. Revolutionaries think outside the box.  They step back, look at the big picture, and drill down to the smaller picture to see what’s really going on.  For example, our President and our leaders say that our national debt is in the trillions of dollars.  Uh-huh.  That’s not entirely true.  What’s happened is that corporations have robbed our government of trillions of dollars.  We know where it is; it’s just shifted hands.  A little automaton who thinks inside the box will see a nation in debt.  A revolutionary will see all that money shifted into the hands of corporations and she’ll try to find a way to get it back into the hands where it belongs–the hands of the people.

Antitrust is a word the current generation isn’t very familiar with.  Antitrust legislation was passed in 1890 and 1914 to prevent monopolies from crushing free trade and local economies.  Since Ronald Reagan’s presidency, these laws have been completely ignored.  Monopolies like Amazon, eBay, Etsy, and PayPal thrive.  If you’re a small business owner, you haven’t much of a chance.  Sooner or later, one of these large corporations will stick its hands all over your small business.  Amazon controls books, Etsy controls handmade crafts, PayPal controls payment transactions, and eBay controls small businesses trying to thrive in a corporate world.

I’m a patriot because I believe in the Constitution.  I believe in the Bill of Rights.

I’m a revolutionary because I’m a patriot.  You can’t be a patriot in today’s society and not be a revolutionary. Here’s what I do.

I don’t shop on Amazon.com.

I buy my books at a local used bookstore, supporting the man who owns the place, his family, his employees, and my local economy.  If they can’t get it, I don’t read it.

I don’t shop on Etsy.com.

Etsy is owned by eBay and so is PayPal.  They denied it for years and now it’s public.

I buy crafts at the local church craft fairs supporting my local community and my local economy.  Anything else, I make it myself or buy it at Goodwill from someone else’s castoffs.

I don’t use PayPal.

If I shop online, I don’t use PayPal.  If that’s their only payment solution, I shop elsewhere.

I don’t shop on eBay.com.

I’m not sure why anyone shops on eBay.  There are so many lawsuits against eBay that California’s court system is backlogged to a three year wait.  They’ve destroyed more small businesses than most corporations combined.  On any given weekend, there are more than 30 garage sales in my neighborhood.  Craigslist has everything else.

I don’t have a cell phone contract.

The other big monopolies are the cell phone companies–AT&T, T-Mobile, Verizon, Sprint, Virgin Mobile, etc.  If you haven’t learned about StraightTalk and Net10, you should check it out.  No contract, no locked phone, no huge bills, unlimited everything.  The best part is that your phone number isn’t sold to advertisers along with your name, address, and social security number.

I don’t have a movie rental plan.

Netflix is another corporation that abuses the system.  Netflix has a DVD shipping plan that is subsidized by American taxpayers.  They’ve been saying they pay the same as everyone else for mailing DVDs, but that’s not true.  Several postal workers dished the dirt on Netflix very publicly on an Amazon forum.  According to their records, Netflix pays two cents per DVD while the taxpayers pay the other 47 cents.  I don’t know about you, but I’d rather see my tax money go to my local economy, not some corporation in California.

I am part of a homeschooling movie swap club where we swap movies and documentaries.  I highly recommend it for every homeschooling group.

I buy used from Craigslist or Goodwill.

You’d be surprised how much you can find at Goodwill or on Craigslist.  Ask at your local church.  Ask your friends and business associates.

I surf the web anonymously.

I use private browsing and a virtual private network when browsing on the internet.  It protects me, my family, and especially my children.  I also use a privacy-enhanced email account at Hushmail.  Large corporations claim that Hushmail is used by criminals.  That’s not true at all.  It is true that Hushmail doesn’t sell your personal information and stops corporations from placing cookies on your computer.  Criminals use Yahoo and Gmail.  Have you heard the joke about the Nigerian on Yahoo?  There’s a reason that joke is funny.  It’s true.

These are all the little things I do and my family does to support my local economy and the Constitution.  We don’t support corporations and that makes me pretty proud of my family.  We are patriots.  We are revolutionaries.

Further Reading

If you liked this post, then here are a few links to further reading.

Bill of Rights.

History of Public Education

The Corporation.

Monopolies

United States Antitrust Laws

Corporations Hiding $2 Trillion from the IRS

Corporations Hiding $18 Trillion in Offshore Accounts

$32 Trillion Hidden in Offshore Accounts

Antitrust Settlement Notice on Amazon

Details of Price-Fixing Lawsuit Against Amazon

Amazon Booksurge Antitrust Lawsuit

Amazon Collecting Personal Information from Browsers

Etsy Using Undeletable Tracking Cookies

Etsy Consumer Complaints

Class Action Lawsuit Against Etsy and Arbitration Clause

Etsy Staff Profiling Non-Whites

Etsy User Purchases Exposed to the Whole World

Etsy Shuts Down Shops for Copyright Infringement

Sarah Feingold Exposed as Etsy Employee Behind Closing of Hundreds of Shops

eBay Parody

Etsy Off the Hook in Privacy Infringement Lawsuit

No Privacy Shopping on Etsy

Search “Amazon Class Action Lawsuit” and you’ll find hundreds more.  Do the same for eBay and PayPal.  All lawsuits against Etsy were reclassified under eBay, the parent company.  Make sure you use BING search engine.  Google unlisted many of the class action lawsuit links to protect other corporations.

 

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